Category Archives: Education

2016 Interview – ASA speaks with retired sociologist Jose Calderon

ASA speaks with retired sociologist Jose Calderon at the 2016 ASA Annual Meeting on August, 2016, in Seattle, WA. Calderon talks about what it means to “do sociology,” how he uses sociology in his work, highlights of his work in the field, the relevance of sociological work to society, and his advice to students interested in entering the field.

Nearly 90 Organizations Urge State Board of Education to Prioritize Equity in Accountability System

Nearly 90 Organizations Urge State Board of Education to Prioritize Equity in Accountability System

 

Joint Letter Sent to the State Board of Education

Read Letter

From civil rights groups and local social justice organizations including the National Council of La Raza, LULAC California and Asian Americans Advancing Justice to education groups and community organizations including the California State Parent Teacher Association, United Ways of California and Children Now, over 80 organizations joined Ed Trust–West in calling for a clear focus on equity in the new education accountability system. In a letter to the State Board of Education in anticipation of their meeting this week, the groups stressed that the system should help close opportunity and achievement gaps by:

  • setting ambitious, long-term goals for student achievement, including gap-closing expectations
  • including a distinct, robust measure of college and career readiness to make sure we graduate students equipped with 21st century skills and knowledge
  • expecting action from a school or district when the data points out gaps in opportunity and achievement

We will continue to keep you updated as the State Board makes important decisions for California’s 6 million K-12 students. A big thank you to the many organizations below that joined us to support these principles for an equity-minded accountability system. In addition to the joint letter, Ed Trust–West also sent this letter with additional feedback on specific State Board of Education proposals.

Advancement Project

After-School All-Stars

Alliance for a Better Community

Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Asian Law Caucus

Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles

Attendance Works

Bay Area Tutor

Black Parallel School Board

Brown Issues – Sacramento City College

Brown Issues – Sacramento State University

Building Blocks for Kids – Richmond Collaborative

CADRE

California Alliance of African American Educators

California Charter Schools Association

California Latino School Boards Association

California LULAC

California PTA

California Science Teachers Association

Camino Nuevo Charter Academy

CD Tech

Center for Ecoliteracy

Center on Race, Poverty & Environment

Central California Environmental Justice Network

Cesar Chavez Foundation

Chicano Latino State Employees Association

Children Now

Children’s Defense Fund – California

Coaching Corps

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA)

Coleman Advocates

College Track

Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice

Congregations Organized for Prophetic Engagement (COPE)

DELAC de SBCUSD

Dolores Huerta Foundation

Educators 4 Excellence

EdVoice

Faith in Action Kern County

GEMAS Consulting

GO Oakland

GO Public Schools

GO West Contra Costa

Growing Up in Santa Cruz

GSA Network

Hmong Innovative Politics

HOLA

Inland Congregation United for Change (ICUC)

Inland Empire Immigrant Youth Coalition

LA Voice

Latino & Latina Roundtable of San Gabriel & Pomona Valley

Los Angeles Education Partnership

LULAC of the Inland Empire

LULAC of the Riverside

Mothers’ Club Family Learning Center

National Center for Youth Law (NCYL)

National Council of La Raza

Orange County Congregation Community Organization

Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE)

Parent Organization Network (PON)

Parent Revolution

Partnership for Los Angeles Schools

Promesa Boyle Heights

Reading and Beyond

Reinvent South Stockton

Roberts Family Development Center

Sacramento Area Congregations Together (SacACT)

San Bernardino City USD District African-American Advisory Council.

San Diego Association of African American Educators

Somos Mayfair

South Stockton Schools Initiative

Stand Up

Student Success California

Students Matter

Teach Plus

The Avalos Foundation

The BlackBoard of West Contra Costa

The Campaign for College Opportunity

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area

The Village Method

Umoja

United Way of Greater Los Angeles

United Ways of California

Urban Strategy Group

Western Center on Law & Poverty

Youth Action Project, Inc.

Youth Together

 

Learn more about Equity & Accountability

 

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Smithsonian Latino Center Accepting Applications for 2016 Young Ambassadors

Smithsonian Latino Center Accepting Applications for 2016 Young Ambassadors Program

March 15, 2016

Deadline: April 4, 2016

The Smithsonian Latino Center, a division of the Smithsonian Institution, works to ensure that Latino contributions to art, science, and the humanities are highlighted, understood, and advanced through the development and support of public programs, scholarly research, museum collections, and educational opportunities at the Smithsonian and its affiliated organizations.

The center is now accepting applications for the 2016 Young Ambassadors Program, an annual program that aims to foster the next generation of Latino leaders in the arts, sciences, and humanities.

Through the program, graduating high school seniors with an interest in and commitment to the arts, sciences, and humanities as they pertain to Latino communities and cultures will be selected to travel to Washington, D.C., for a weeklong seminar at the Smithsonian. The week consists of visits to the Smithsonian’s Latino collections and one-on-one interaction with renowned experts from various fields, including museum professionals. Following the week in Washington, students participate in a four-week interdisciplinary internship in museums and cultural institutions in seventeen cities across the United States and Puerto Rico, including Smithsonian-affiliated organizations.

Student selection is based on demonstrated interest, commitment and excellence in the arts, sciences, and humanities as well as academic record, leadership experience, and dedication to education and community service. The program includes meals and accommodations for the duration of the one-week training seminar, round-trip travel to Washington, D.C., and a program stipend following the four-week internship. Upon completion of the five-week program, participants will receive $2,000 to apply to their future educational plans.

For complete program guidelines, an FAQ, and application instructions, see the Smithsonian Latino Center Web site.

Link to Complete RFP

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If interested in concept of “Community Schools”

If you are interested: The next Latino and Latina Roundtable  Community Development Committee this Wednesday, March 9th at 7 PM at the Parent’s Center at PUSD (800 S. Garey Ave., Second Floor will focus on the concept of “community schools” as presented by Kyle Serrette from the Center for Democracy.  He is visiting the PUSD and will be presenting on the concept of “community schools,” what is being implemented in other areas, and the outlook on advancing the concept of “community schools” here.  This will also be an opportunity for the Community Development group and others (that we invite to be part of this) to ask questions.  

Jose Zapata CalderonSchool

LRT Social Justice Scholarship- Accepting Applications Until March 6

The Latino(a) Roundtable is extending our deadline for our 2016 Social Justice Scholarship until Sunday March 6, 2016.

Please help us in spreading the word and encouraging eligible students to apply!

The Latino(a) Roundtable is seeking to financially reward young activist from the San Gabriel and Pomona Valley who will be attending a University or Community College for the 2016-17 school year pursuing their bachelors who has demonstrated a commitment to social justice as evidenced by their involvement in community organizing.

Requirements: Social Justice Application, 2 page Personal statement and two letters of recommendation speaking to the students character and activism.

Help us in recognizing young leaders in our community!!

serve the people,

Amy Dennise Reyes Tam

LRT Scholarship Application 2016-Extended Deadline March 6 2016

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Education Trust–West San Bernardino Kick-Off (Tues. Feb 23 @ Noon)

Below you’ll see our invitation to Latino and Latina Roundtable and other organizations to kick-off The Education Trust—West newest hub in San Bernardino next Tuesday, Feb. 23rd at Noon on CSU San Bernardino. Continue reading

John S. Martinez Scholarship: Now Accepting Applications!

John S. Martinez Leadership Scholarship: Now Accepting Applications! 

Washington, D.C. – The National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators (NHCSL) is now accepting applications for the John S. Martinez Leadership Scholarship.

NHCSL will award scholarships to a total of eleven (11) Hispanic public high school students that reside in the district of a Hispanic State Legislator. Each student will receive a one-time $3,000.00 grant to use towards their higher education and will be recognized in their community for their excellent academic achievements.  

“This unique scholarship not only helps offset the increasing costs of higher education but also allows students of Hispanic origin to highlight their perspectives of public service. Through the John S. Martinez Leadership Scholarship, we can acknowledge and celebrate the many successes of these students throughout the country.” –Representative Angel Cruz, President of the NHCSL.

This scholarship is in honor of the late John S. Martinez, a Hispanic leader who served as a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives and a Former President of the NHCSL. Comcast NBCUniversal has made this initiative possible through a generous grant which has allowed the NHCSL to continue its efforts in “Closing the Achievement Gap” for Hispanic students.

NHCSL highly encourages qualified students to log on to our website, www.nhcsl.org to submit an application. The deadline for applications is March 18, 2016.                                 

 

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The NHCSL is the premier national association of Hispanic state legislators working to design and implement policies and procedures that will improve the quality of life for Hispanics throughout the country. NHCSL was founded in 1989 as a nonpartisan, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization with the mission to be the most effective voice for the more than 350 Hispanic legislators. For more information visit www.nhcsl.org.

Pilar Garzon

National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators

444 North Capitol St. NW Ste. 404

Washington, D.C. 20001

P: (202) 434-8070 |F: (202) 434-8072

www.nhcsl.org 

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Scholarships For DREAMers, By DREAMers, 3rd National Round, Remains Open till February 15, 2016!

3rd National Round, Remains Open! – Apply by February 15, 2016

For More Info: http://www.thedream.us/

20 seconds- English PSA- Don Graham – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuA7UU4dqGY

 30 seconds- English PSA- Don Graham –  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77dlQw43boY

19 Seconds- Spanish PSA- Gaby Pacheco – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRt72JW-G9g

 

30 seconds-Spanish PSA- Gaby Pacheco – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6_6XcYi5s0

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS

*for First Time College Students & Community College Graduates who Attend Partner Colleges

Latino Education & Advocacy Days (LEAD) Organization has again partnered with TheDream.US to help spread the word about college scholarships that are available to highly motivated DREAMers who want to get a college education but cannot afford it. Our scholarships will help cover your tuition and fees for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree at one of our Partner Colleges.  If you are chosen as a DREAM Scholar, you must be accepted to and eligible for in-state tuition (if applicable) at one of our Partner Colleges in order to receive the Scholarship. The in-state tuition requirement does not apply to DREAM Scholars who attend one of our private Partner Colleges or Kaplan University, as there are no residency restrictions for these colleges.  Scholars who wish to attend ASU Online must live in Arizona.

For a list of the partner colleges and descriptions please click here: Partner College List and Descriptions   

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR FIRST TIME COLLEGE STUDENTS

This scholarship is available to high school seniors or high school graduates with demonstrated financial need who are first time college students and seek to earn a career-ready associate’s or bachelor’s degree at one of our Partner Colleges. Students who are currently enrolled in college are not eligible. Scholars are selected from a nationwide pool of applicants.  To be eligible to apply, you must:

·      Either graduate from high school or earn your GED diploma by the end of the 2015-2016 academic year or have already graduated or earned your GED diploma;

·   Have earned a high school un-weighted GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale (or an equivalent GED score);

·   Not have enrolled in an associate’s or bachelor’s degree program or have earned college credits (excluding credits earned while in a high school pre-college, dual enrollment program, advanced placement testing, or through the College Level Examination Program CLEP);

·   Intend to enroll full-time in an associate’s or bachelor’s degree program at one of TheDream.US Partner Colleges within one year of receiving the Scholarship;

·   Be eligible for in-state tuition if seeking to attend a Partner College that is a public institution;

·   Have come to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday;

·   Be DACA or TPS eligible and have applied for or received DACA or TPS approval; and

·   Demonstrate significant unmet financial need.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGE GRADUATES

The Community College Graduate Scholarship is available to community college students with demonstrated financial need who have earned their associate’s degrees and seek to complete their bachelor’s degrees at one of our four-year Partner Colleges. Students who are currently enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program are not eligible. Scholars are selected from a nationwide pool of applicants.

To be eligible to apply, you must:

·         Either earn an associate’s degree from an accredited community college by the end of the 2015-2016 academic year or have already earned your associate’s degree from an accredited community college;

·         Have earned a college GPA of 3.0 or greater on a 4.0 scale;

·         Not have yet enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program;

·         Intend to enroll full-time in a bachelor’s degree program at one of TheDream.US Partner Colleges in the 2016-2017 academic year;

·         Be eligible for in-state tuition if seeking to attend a Partner College that is a public institution;

·         Have come to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday;

·         Be DACA or TPS eligible and have applied for or received DACA or TPS approval; and

·         Demonstrate significant unmet financial need.

Find out more on our Frequently Asked Questions or Guidelines pages.

Our Scholars are selected by DREAMers and people from DREAMer-supportive organizations based on their academic achievement and motivation to succeed. Our Scholars commit to their own academic achievement and to help build a National Community of DREAMer Scholars which provides peer-to-peer support and mentoring to each other and future DREAMer Scholars. 

Visit www.TheDream.US for more information.

TheDream.US is a project of New Venture Fund, a 501(c)(3), which provides fiscal sponsorship for innovative public interest projects focused on conservation, education, and global health.

Don’t forget to share this information with friends and family!

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Standardized Tests

I so much agree with this — testing has become everything — and often promotes a type of a standardized “banking” system — where the power of disseminating knowledge fits into the early twentieth century industrial model of schools where students were socialized in assembly-like rows to be taught the status quo and not to be heard from (or if heard from – only through testing). With the promotion of standardized tests and quantitative methods that evaluate the performances of both teachers and students, there is a diminishing of the space for the creation of democratic bridges between what is being learned in the classroom and the challenges of democratic decision-making in our communities.

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