Category Archives: Immigrant Rights

Immigration Committee Meeting Saturday at 1 pm

This meeting will be in Spanish to update our community on legislative updates and other matters pertaining to immigration.  We will have a meeting at a later date that is bilingual. Please invite others.

Hola Familia de LRT!

 Les invitamos a nuestra reunión virtual con nuestro comité de inmigración este sábado 17 de abril a la 1:00 PM donde Hablaremos de las Propuestas Migratorias de Ley y del Fairplex de Pomona sirviendo como un sitio de admisión de emergencia para albergar temporalmente a los menores no  acompañados que llegan a la frontera surfer Estados Unidos.  Solo de click en el siguiente enlace:

 https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86066845770

 Comparta la información por favor, los esperamos.  Esta será reunión en español.

 

……

Hello LRT Family! We invite you to our virtual meeting with our immigration committee this Saturday, April 17 at 1:00 PM where we will discuss the Immigration Bills for 2021 and the Pomona Fairplex serving as an emergency admission site to temporarily house unaccompanied minors that arrive at the southern border.

Just click on the following link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86066845770

Share the information please, we look forward to seeing you.

In solidarity, 
 

LRT team

Invitation to April 18th Immigration Forum

You are invited to a Voices for a New Democracy forum on Immigrant Rights.  The speakers include: Jose Calderon, introduction and overview; Lee Wang on a brief history of the prison to deportation pipeline and the possibilities for movement building between the immigrants rights movement and the movement for black lives;   Leticia Bustamante, a national leader on the DACA movement, will present on DACA and its relation to the immigrant rights movement; and  Professor Miguel Tinker-Salas will present on the “Latin American Continent on the Move,” the effects of neoliberalism on border migration, and the consequences of failed immigration policies.
Here is the Zoom link for April 18th:
Jose Zapata Calderon
Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Chicano/a and Latino/a Studies
1050 North Mills Avenue
Claremont, CA 91711-6101
(909) 952-1640
 Jose_Calderon@pitzer.edu
Website:  www.josezcalderon.com

Immigration Reform

Your invitation to Immigrant Rights Roundtable Academy Zoom on Tuesday, June 30 – 7 PM

The LRT is pleased to invite you to our next Roundtable Academy Zoom discussion on Immigrant Rights on June 30, 2020 at 7:00PM.

The Immigrant Rights discussion is a continuation of our efforts to deepen our understanding of the issues that the LRT has prioritized as part of our strategic planning. Our goal is to develop a “working position paper” that will inform our strategic plan  for the next three years.

The June 30, discussion will include presentations from members who have direct experience with immigration issues (including DACA, Temporary Protective Status, and Exlusion from Federal Relief Programs)  –  that are directly impacting their families and the immigrant community at large.

Madeline Rios and Angela Sanbrano, Immigrant Rights Lead Team Coordinators will moderate the discussion (which will be translated in both English and Spanish).  The zoom link is:  https://pitzer.zoom.us/j/96051588465

Jose Calderon is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: LRT Roundtable Academy discussion on Immigrant Rights
Time: Jun 30, 2020 07:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)
Join Zoom Meeting
Meeting ID: 960 5158 8465
One tap mobile
+16699006833,,96051588465# US (San Jose)
+13462487799,,96051588465# US (Houston)
Dial by your location
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
Meeting ID: 960 5158 8465
Find your local number: https://pitzer.zoom.us/u/aAFLTktSV
LLRT logo

Your invitation to join us on Radio Jornalera On May Day to honor essential and excluded workers

Join us on Radio Jornalera on May 1.  Angela Sanbrano and Jose Calderon will be part of  the slot from 5pm-6pm “Historia del Primero de Mayo”   Dolores Huerta is going to participate at 12 noon.

LRT to March in support of Immigrant children as part of Pomona Poor People March and Rally this Sat. June 23

The Latino and Latina Roundtable invites our members and friends to
be part of a contingent in the Poor People’s Campaign March and  Rally
this Saturday, June 23 from 11 am to 3 pm at the Civic Center of
Pomona (Mission and Garey) alongside the NAACP and other organizations.
As part of the theme “Pursuing Liberty in the Face of Injustice,”  The
Latino and Latina Roundtable members will be particularly marching in
support of human rights for the immigrant children who have been
separated from their families and who, this administration has vowed
to continue to detain although public pressure has forced a change in
policy to somehow “keep families together” as part of still
implementing a “zero tolerance” policy.    LRT members will be making
posters in support of these children and families (to carry in the march)
this Friday, June 22 at the Solidarity Center (at the Village (1444
E. Holt Ave. in Pomona — Entrance #3 – Classroom 6)
from 12 noon until 2 PM if you are interested in
helping.  ”  The event includes booths, free food and drinks, – —
 a March around 4 blocks — and short speeches focusing
on important issues being faced by our diverse communities.

San Dimas City Council to take up SB-54 at April 24th public meeting

While San Dimas Mayor Curt Morris and Dennis Bertone don’t believe that “a brief opposing Senate Bill 54” should be taken up, Councilman Ryan Vienna, a Lieutenant with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, “personally signed a brief opposing Senate Bill 54” and – has been pushing the council to do the same (resulting in another public meeting on the issue on April 24th).  Other cities, such as San Gabriel and Santa Ana have approved “safe cities” resolutions “affirming the city’s commitment to its immigrant population.”  The city council in Pomona, in putting this affirmation into action, went as far as to pass an ordinance that includes “the development and implementation of training materials for city personnel as they pertain to the requirements of SB 54.”

 

https://www.dailybulletin.com/2018/04/11/san-dimas-city-council-to-decide-when-to-discuss-sanctuary-state-laws-impact-on-city/

https://www.dailybulletin.com/2017/12/19/pomona-gives-final-approval-to-local-ordinance-ensuring-sanctuary-state-legislation-is-implemented/

 

Jose Zapata Calderon
Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Chicano/a and Latino/a Studies
1050 North Mills Avenue
Claremont, CA 91711-6101
(909) 952-1640
 Jose_Calderon@pitzer.edu
Website:  www.josezcalderon.com

Pomona Gives Final Approval to Local Ordinance Ensuring “Sanctuary State” Legislation is Implemented

1220_nws_idb_l_pomvalact_01

Members of the audience attending the Dec. 18, 2017 Pomona City Council meeting break out in applause after the City Council approved an ordinance ensure the implementation of SB 54, the so called “sanctuary state” legislation, in the city. Photo by Monica Rodriguez/ Inland Valley Daily Bulletin.POMONA >> Hundreds passed on a chance to address the Pomona City Council Monday night and simply asked that their names be read into the record as being in support of an ordinance guaranteeing the city will comply with state legislation some have called the “sanctuary state” law.

Pomona City Clerk Eva Buice read the names — more than 300 of them —  into the record before some 40 speakers, about 30 calling for approval of the ordinance and another 10 opposing it, spoke before the city council.

After listening to all comments, city council members gave unanimous final approval to the ordinance. The council had given it preliminary approval Dec. 11.

“People are living in fear. They are scared,” said Councilwoman Ginna Escobar, referring to residents of the city who are in the country without the necessary immigration documents.

Some people have tried to obtain the required paperwork, Escobar said, but it is one that is difficult to complete.

Addressing the fears of Pomona residents who are in the country illegally or who have family and friends without the necessary documents is of such concern to Pomonans that the issue has brought people together.

“More than ever, we are united with love and compassion,” she said.

Mayor Tim Sandoval said people don’t leave their countries because they have a desire to move out. They leave because they are facing situations that make it difficult for them to stay.

“They seek a better future,” Sandoval said.

Monday’s meeting was contentious even before it started. At times, opponents to the ordinance shouted “USA, USA, USA” while supporters sat in their seats and sang “De Colores,” a song that became an informal anthem of the United Farm Workers in the 1960s.

The singing prompted at least one of the outnumbered opponents to call out, “In English! This is America! This isn’t Mexico!” The audience members maintained their composure and continued to sing.

Later, an ordinance opponent and an audience member engaged in a shouting match.

This fall, immigrant-rights groups called on the city council to adopt an ordinance that would place city policies in line with the requirements set by Senate Bill 54, formally known as the California Values Act.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed SB 54 into law in October with the legislation set to go into effect  Jan. 1. Generally, the state law will prohibit California and local law enforcement from using their resources to carry out federal immigration-enforcement activities.This would include investigating, interrogating, detaining or arresting people.

“SB 54 correctly identifies that the enforcement of federal civil immigration law falls exclusively within the jurisdiction of the federal government,” according to a city staff report. “As such, no city department has any inherent authority or duty to investigate or assist in (the) enforcement of such federal law. Entangling state and local agencies with federal immigration enforcement programs diverts already limited resources and blurs the lines of accountability between local, state and federal governments.”

Pomona’s ordinance ensures the “city policy remains in conformity with state law on the issue, in particular, the requirement now under SB 54 that cities do not engage in immigration enforcement purposes except under specific circumstances” such as cases in which a judicial warrant was issued, the staff report reads.

Under the ordinance, the city “affirms” that requirements set by the state involving confidentiality of personal information, as is already done by the city, will be extended to include immigration enforcement actions, according to the staff report.

The city will also be prohibited from entering into agreements unless they are in compliance with SB 54, the staff report reads.

SB 54 will require police departments to submit a yearly report to the California Department of Justice with details of their involvement in any joint law enforcement task force. Under the city’s ordinance, Pomona’s city manager must provide the same information to the City Council when it’s submitted to the state, the staff report reads.

Pomona’s ordinance ensures that “neither the city nor any official, employee, agent or contractor of the city will be able to amend this stated city policy to make such policies out of compliance with this ordinance or SB 54,” according to the staff report.

In addition, Pomona’s city manager will be responsible for developing and implementing training materials for city personnel as they pertain to the requirements of SB 54, the city staff report reads. The city manager also will present a report to the council at least once a year on the status of training and compliance with the state legislation.

Before the council voted on the matter, one of the speakers referred to the undocumented as “criminals, rapists, they are law breakers,” to the displeasure of most of the audience.

Speaker Maria Valencia later said, “I’m a very hard worker. I’m not a criminal” and, she added, she’s a native of Mexico.

Robin Hvidston, of the Claremont-based We The People Rising, was among the 10 speakers who opposed the ordinance.

“We should have our local government support our federal laws,” she said. “The council should be helping the homeless, homeless Americans.”

Approving the ordinance will only send a message that will attract those participating in human trafficking and drug trafficking activities, she said.

Mayor Tim Sandoval said the ordinance wouldn’t have been established without the involvement of several groups including the ICE Out of Pomona Coalition and the Latino/Latina Roundtable of the San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys.

Council members listened to the public, including parents, children and local ministers. Sandoval said.

Adopting the ordinance sends a clear message, he said.

“This is your city, your community,” Sandoval said. “We don’t want anyone to feel unwelcome here.”

Pomona Approval of Sanctuary State Compliance Measure

Pomona gives first approval to ‘sanctuary state’ compliance measure

 

By Monica Rodriguez | morodriguez@scng.com | Daily Bulletin

PUBLISHED: December 11, 2017 at 11:53 pm | UPDATED: December 12, 2017 at 5:07 pm

POMONA >> City leaders gave preliminary approval Monday night to a proposed Pomona ordinance meant to ensure the city will implement requirements spelled out in the state’s new so-called “sanctuary state” law.

Immigrant-rights groups urged the City Council to adopt an ordinance to keep Pomona in conformance with SB 54, known as the California Values Act.

Pomona City Council members voted unanimously for the proposed ordinance, which will come back to the council Dec. 18 for a final vote.

The ordinance was crafted with the involvement of representatives of various immigrant-rights groups, the city’s police chief and deputy chief, and members of the city attorney’s office, said Councilwoman Cristina Carrizosa.

“It’s was a very collaborative process,” Mayor Tim Sandoval said. “Out of this came the document you see … I think everyone is proud of the final document.”

Gov. Jerry Brown signed the California Values Act into law in October. The legislation goes into effect Jan. 1.

Generally, the law will prohibit state and local law enforcement agencies from using their resources for immigration-enforcement purposes including investigating, interrogating, detaining or arresting people.

Pomona’s proposed ordinance will ensure “city policy remains in conformity with state law on the issue, in particular, the requirement now under SB 54 that cities do not engage in immigration enforcement purposes except under specific circumstances,” according to a city staff report. That would include cases in which a judicial warrant was issued.

Among the things the proposed ordinance would do is prohibit the city from entering into agreements unless they are in compliance with SB 54, the staff report reads.

State legislation will require police departments to provide an annual report to the California Department of Justice with details of participation in any joint law enforcement task force. The proposed ordinance will require the Pomona city manager to provide the same information to the City Council at the same time it is submitted to the state Department of Justice, the staff report reads.

Pomona’s proposed ordinance will ensure that “neither the city nor any official, employee, agent or contractor of the city will be able to amend this stated city policy to make such policies out of compliance with this ordinance or SB 54,” according to the staff report.

The proposed ordinance makes it clear that the Pomona city manager is responsible for development and implementation of the training materials for city personnel as it pertains to the scope and requirements of SB 54, the city staff report reads.

The city manager also will present to the City Council a report on the status of training and compliance with SB 54. The report will be provided at least once a year to the City Council or when requested by the council.

Sandoval reiterated that the City Council is “in full support of all our residents in the city,” he said. “We are going to do everything that we can to protect you.”

Prior to the council’s vote, Jose Calderon, president of the Latino and Latina Roundtable of the San Gabriel and Pomona Valley, told the council that over the years the city and a coalition of local organizations have worked together to address issues of concern to the city’s immigrant population. Issues have ranged from addressing the needs of day laborers seeking work to support for state legislation that has resulted in driver’s licenses being issued to those living in the state without the proper immigration documents.

“This is very important to our community which includes immigrants and the families of immigrants,” Calderon said.

Tuesday, Calderon said he was happy with council’s action and is demonstrating it is “taking the lead and figuring out how to ensure the voice and protection of those in a section of the community not always heard.”

But not everyone agrees with the direction the City Council is taking. Ira Mehlman, spokesman for the Federation of American Immigration Reform, said Tuesday actions such as those taken by the  Pomona City Council are those of local leaders who are upset with the federal government taking steps to enforce immigration regulations.

“Ultimately, it is SB 54 that’s in violation of federal law,” Mehlman said.

In 1996, Congress adopted legislation outlawing sanctuary cities yet the federal government has not challenged California’s legislation or that of cities, he said.

The actions California, Pomona and other communities are sending to those in the country illegally including those who are undocumented and have committed a serious crime is “we will do whatever it takes to protect and coddle you,” Mehlman said.

Calderon said the nation is living through a period in which policies that have allowed people to live in the country legally are being overturned, instilling fear in them and their loved ones in addition to leaving them facing an uncertain future.

The Pomona City Council’s actions provide some help to people in such a situation, Calderon said.

“It’s really a courageous act,” he said.